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Cassini’s best images taken over two decades

Cassini's Best Images Taken Over Two Decades

The Cassini–Huygens mission, commonly called Cassini, was a collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency to send a probe to study the planet Saturn and its system, including its rings and natural satellites.

It has been in operation since 1997 and it has brought us ever closer to the outer planets, especially Saturn and its moons.

Below are some of the best images taken of Saturn and its moons by Cassini.

The Day The Earth Smiled

Full processed mosaic of images taken by the Cassini spacecraft on July 19, 2013

Top Of The World

These turbulent clouds are on top of the world at Saturn.

These turbulent clouds are on top of the world at Saturn.

Prometheus and the Ghostly F Ring

The thin sliver of Saturn's moon Prometheus lurks near ghostly structures in Saturn's narrow F ring in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

The thin sliver of Saturn’s moon Prometheus lurks near ghostly structures in Saturn’s narrow F ring in this view from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

Two Titans

These two views of Saturn's moon Titan exemplify how NASA's Cassini spacecraft has revealed the surface of this fascinating world.

These two views of Saturn’s moon Titan exemplify how NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has revealed the surface of this fascinating world.

Highlighting Titan’s Hazes

NASA's Cassini spacecraft looks toward the night side of Saturn's moon Titan in a view that highlights the extended, hazy nature of the moon's atmosphere.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft looks toward the night side of Saturn’s moon Titan in a view that highlights the extended, hazy nature of the moon’s atmosphere.

Cloudy Waves

Clouds on Saturn take on the appearance of strokes from a cosmic brush thanks to the wavy way that fluids interact in Saturn's atmosphere.

Clouds on Saturn take on the appearance of strokes from a cosmic brush thanks to the wavy way that fluids interact in Saturn’s atmosphere.

Saturn-lit Tethys

Cassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet.

Cassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet.

Nevertheless, It Moves

The heavens often seem vast and unchanging as seen from Earth, but movement in the skies is the norm.
The heavens often seem vast and unchanging as seen from Earth, but movement in the skies is the norm.

So Far from Home

With this view, Cassini captured one of its last looks at Saturn and its main rings from a distance.

With this view, Cassini captured one of its last looks at Saturn and its main rings from a distance.

Saturn: Before the Plunge

This image of Saturn's northern hemisphere was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Sept. 13, 2017. It is among the last images Cassini sent back to Earth. The view was taken in visible red light using the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera at a distance of 684,000 miles (1.1 million kilometers) from Saturn.

This image of Saturn’s northern hemisphere was taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Sept. 13, 2017. It is among the last images Cassini sent back to Earth. The view was taken in visible red light using the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera at a distance of 684,000 miles (1.1 million kilometers) from Saturn.

Impact Site: Cassini’s Final Image

This monochrome view is the last image taken by the imaging cameras on NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It looks toward the planet's night side, lit by reflected light from the rings, and shows the location at which the spacecraft would enter the planet's atmosphere hours later.

This monochrome view is the last image taken by the imaging cameras on NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. It looks toward the planet’s night side, lit by reflected light from the rings, and shows the location at which the spacecraft would enter the planet’s atmosphere hours later.

Zoom-in on Epimetheus

This zoomed-in view of Epimetheus, one of the highest resolution ever taken, shows a surface covered in craters, vivid reminders of the hazards of space.

This zoomed-in view of Epimetheus, one of the highest resolution ever taken, shows a surface covered in craters, vivid reminders of the hazards of space.

Small Wonders

This montage of views from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows three of Saturn's small ring moons.

This montage of views from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows three of Saturn’s small ring moons.

Short Shadow

The projection of Saturn's shadow on the rings grows shorter as Saturn’s season advances toward northern summer.

The projection of Saturn’s shadow on the rings grows shorter as Saturn’s season advances toward northern summer.

North Pole of Enceladus

In the north, Enceladus' surface appears to be about as old as any in the solar system. The south, however, is an entirely different story.

In the north, Enceladus’ surface appears to be about as old as any in the solar system. The south, however, is an entirely different story.

Hail the Hexagon

Saturn's hexagonal polar jet stream is the shining feature of almost every view of the north polar region of Saturn.

Saturn’s hexagonal polar jet stream is the shining feature of almost every view of the north polar region of Saturn.

Clear Blue

The hexagon in clear blue

The hexagon in clear blue.

The Big One

Mimas' gigantic crater Herschel lies near the moon's limb in this Cassini view.

Mimas’ gigantic crater Herschel lies near the moon’s limb in this Cassini view.

Dichotomy

Enceladus is a world divided. To the north, we see copious amounts of craters and evidence of the many impacts the moon has suffered in its history.

Enceladus is a world divided. To the north, we see copious amounts of craters and evidence of the many impacts the moon has suffered in its history.

Infrared Saturn Clouds

This false-color view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows clouds in Saturn's northern hemisphere. The view was made using images taken by Cassini's wide-angle camera on July 20, 2016, using a combination of spectral filters sensitive to infrared light at 750, 727 and 619 nanometers.

This false-color view from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows clouds in Saturn’s northern hemisphere. The view was made using images taken by Cassini’s wide-angle camera on July 20, 2016, using a combination of spectral filters sensitive to infrared light at 750, 727 and 619 nanometers.

Helorus in Half-light

Cassini captures a crater duo on Saturn's moon Dione that is superimposed on older, linear features.

Cassini captures a crater duo on Saturn’s moon Dione that is superimposed on older, linear features.

Tethys Tops Saturn

An illusion of perspective, Saturn’s moon Tethys seems to hang above the planet's north pole in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

An illusion of perspective, Saturn’s moon Tethys seems to hang above the planet’s north pole in this view from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

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